Sponsorship

Become a Sponsor - sponsorship for $50/year

It's everyone's dream to be able to provide a safe forever home for animals in need. We would like you to be a part of the 'Freedom Hill Gang' and play a special part in the care of our animal residents.

Select to sponsor one of our lucky residents and you will receive a sponsorship certificate with your very own 5 x 7 picture of your individual fur baby along with their story.

Your sponsorship will assist in the care and attention of that particular resident as well as the other animal residents. Sponsorship makes a fantastic gift for kids, friends or family!

If you would like to sponsor one of our residents for only $50 per year please select your baby today!

Thank you from the gang at Freedom Hill x

  • Annabelle

    Born August 19th 2012

    Annabelle came from the same dairy farm as Gene. Annabelle was originally thought to be a 'bobby calf' - a boy of no use to the dairy farm.  However she turned out to be a little girl! Anna would have grown up to become a dairy cow just like her mother, used like a machine, made to give birth every year to produce milk. What most people don't know is that for dairy cows to produce a continual supply of milk they have to be pregnant or have just given birth, their unwanted calves usually sent off to slaughter in the first few days of their lives. The milk from the mother cows is then used for human consumption. Around 700,000 bobby calves are slaughtered in Australia every year. If you would like to help little girls like Annabelle, switch to dairy-free items when choosing your groceries! Or visit Vegan Online for a heap of yummy alternatives. 

  • Audrey & Willow

    Born January 2014

    Willow and Audrey arrived at Freedom Hill Sanctuary during January 2014,  both saved from ending up at someone's dinner. They settled into their new home quickly and are now the cheekiest residents we've ever had. Like all pigs, these girls love nothing more than playing, relaxing in the sun,  cooling off in mud baths and making nests. Pigs that are kept on factory farms don't get to enjoy these natural behaviours, they spend their miserable lives confined in sow stalls and farrowing crates, which are too small for them to turn around in. 

  • Batman & Christina

    Born March 2014

    Batman & Christina are brother & sister. Kym & Isabelle were driving past a local dairy farm and saw these two babies being born, they watched their first steps and saw mummy cleaning them. Both were unable to feed from their mum and after speaking with the farmer learned both would be destined for the meat truck, (which comes by every fortnight), being twins rendered them 'useless' to the farm.  Did you know that each year in Australia close to 700,000 calves just like these gorgeous babies are killed within their first week of life, waste products of the dairy industry. Ditch the dairy and help little babes like Batman & Christina! 

  • Bj

    Born 10th December 2011

    Bj is another 'reject' from the dairy industry, his story is similar to Teddy's. We brought him to Freedom Hill at just 4 days old, straight from the dairy farm. Collecting Bj was heartbreaking – his mother was still close and to hear a mother call for her baby and him call back was heart wrenching. We did ask if we could take his mum but of course the farmers didn't want their profits leaving. The only comfort was to promise his mum that her son would be looked after forever. Bj missed his mum for two days and nights calling for her until he realized that she wasn't returning and then he finally started to settle.

    Bj has always been our quieter more reserved baby, but not unlike Teddy he enjoys his cuddles every now and again, but stills likes his own space. He is now over a year old and loves running around with his best friends Teddy and Jacob. 

  • Bradley

    Born 25th July 2017

    Bradley was one lucky little lamb, born in stormy wet weather and orphaned shortly after birth he fought to survive a long freezing night alone and unaided. Sheep are incredible strong and their will to live is amazing, showing in this little guys fight to survive. Bradley is loved and happy at Freedom Hill Sanctuary, his belly will never be empty again.

    Please consider sponsoring him and watch his growth.

  • Darcy

    Born April 2013

    Darcy arrived (with Cotton) at Freedom Hill on April 19th 2013. Both boys were tiny week-old orphans who were rescued by a lovely lady from a property in South Australia. This super adorable duo have already settled into their new home and will no doubt love living with the sheep gang. Darcy and Cotton are already showing their playful and mischievous characters. What many people don't realise is that farmed animals have beautiful personalities, show emotions and can feel fear & pain, just like cats and dogs. 

    Anyone that has met this sheep knows just how amazing he is. Darcy loves people and loves having his photo taken! 

  • Esme

    Birth Date Unknown

    The cheeky Esme was brought to us on 27th March 2012. Esme was rescued from a neglectful situation. She was found on a property tied up with a large and cumbersome collar, she had also been deprived of food and water. She was incredibly skinny but it didn't take too long for her to start gaining weight. Esme is now healthy, happy and loves spending her days bossing everyone around.  She is the cheekiest resident at Freedom Hill and likes to spend time in all of the paddocks, jumping through all of the fences just to make sure she gets to sample everyones food! 

    Esme you will always be our sassy show off. 

  • Gene

    Born 19th August 2012

    Gene is a beautiful Friesian steer - he was rescued from a dairy farm at just 6 days old. Gene is a 'bobby calf', a waste product of the dairy industry. For dairy cows to produce a continual supply of milk they have to be pregnant or have just given birth, their unwanted calves usually sent off to slaughter in the first few days of their lives. The milk from the mother cows is then used for human consumption. Most bobby calves are not as lucky as Gene, around 700,000 are slaughtered in Australia every year. If you would like to help little guys like Gene, switch to dairy-free items when choosing your groceries! Or visit Vegan Online for a heap of yummy alternatives. 

    If you haven't guessed already our darling Gene is named after Gene Baur, co-founder and president of Farm Sanctuary in America, the first sanctuary for farmed animals. It was founded in 1986 and is now the largest and most effective farm animal rescue and protection organisation. They have rescued thousands of animals and have 3 different sanctuaries - one in Watkins Glen, New York and two in California. 

  • Helen

    Born May 2014

    Meet Helen, the blind calf that was rescued from a beef farm at just 11 days old. Helen is a shorthorn heifer; she was born white and blind due to a recessive gene from the bull. The farm she came from didn't have any time or use for her, luckily we were notified of her need for a new home. This precious lady is the sweetest little calf, she is incredibly calm and gentle. She has already settled into her new home and made friends with Batman & Christina. 

    Just like the American educator Helen Keller, who overcame the adversity of being blind and deaf to become one of the 20th century's leading humanitarians, our Helen has come to Freedom Hill to help us change the way people view farm animals. 

    Welcome to your safe forever home Helen. 

    To learn more on Helen's amazing story head to Animals Australia

  • Holly

    Born December 2015

    Holly arrived at Freedom Hill Sanctuary during December 2015. This lucky little piggy was saved from ending up as someone’s Christmas lunch. Holly is one very cheeky lady and likes to spend her time doing whatever she wants. Like all pigs, Holly loves nothing more than playing, relaxing in the sun, cooling off in mud baths and making nests. Pigs that are kept on factory farms don't get to enjoy these natural behaviours, they spend their miserable lives confined in sow stalls and farrowing crates, which are too small for them to turn around in.

  • Kismet

    Born 25th September 2017

    Kismet was rescued from a dairy farm at 1 day old.  His frail body too weak to stand and not able to suckle, his future was looking dim.  After intensive 24/7 care for 1 week including numerous vet visits, tube feeding electrolytes to sustain energy, teaching Kismet to suckle and never giving up is why Kismet survived.   Every life is important and the incredible fight to survive is Kismet’s true nature. Every life is important and every animal wants to live.    A mother cow is forced to continue to birth a calf so her milk supply continues for human consumption.   Please consider the lives of males calves born into the dairy industry, most do not live any more than 4 days old as they are wastage.   Ditch the dairy and save lives.

  • Lynn

    Born 1st July 2011

    Lynn was born on a cold Sunday night in July. One of a twin, Lynn's mother rejected him at birth. The farmer found him the next morning cold, wet, hungry and extremely weak, took pity on him and gave him to someone in the area to bottle-feed. Lynn then luckily found his way to us! Yes, Lynn is a boy (named after Lyn White from Animals Australia) and is the funniest Dorper sheep you will ever meet.

    Lynn's antics and beautiful character was the driving force behind Freedom Hill. As all of us have heard throughout the years 'sheep are dumb', quickly becomes a comment to humour once you have experienced how intelligent, witty and cheeky sheep can be. During Lynn's first few months he grew up with four dogs so he naturally thought he was a dog, then we moved to Freedom Hill and introduced the calves, then Lynn thought he was a cow. Now he is the leader of the sheep clan, and keeps all the young ones in line. Lynn believes he is the only one and doesn't share well and especially doesn't share cuddles!

    Lynn you will always be a leader in your field, we love you sweet boy.

  • Patrick

    Born 22nd December 2012

    Patrick is a Friesian bobby calf and we were very fortunate to have found him. Kym & I set out to the local fodder store to stock up on supplies and decided to take a different route home, we ended up driving past a dairy farm where we spotted Patrick. He had been left on the concrete floor of the milking shed in full sun, it was extremely hot and he was just lying on the ground. I asked the farmer if we could take him, he replied that he was just "surplus" and suggested we could buy him for $40.  We quickly agreed and brought Patrick back to Freedom Hill. 


    Patrick is a waste product of the dairy industry - for dairy cows to produce a continual supply of milk they have to be pregnant or have just given birth, their unwanted calves are usually sent off the slaughter within the first few days of their lives. The milk from the mother cows is then used for human consumption. Most bobby calves are not as lucky as Patrick, around 700,000 are slaughtered in Australia every year. If you would like to help little guys like Patrick ditch the dairy and switch the healthy dairy free alternatives. We stock a variety of yummy products at Vegan Online

  • Pearl

    Born May 2012

    Pearl is one very lucky little piggy. This precious lady was originally bought as a 'pet' and lived in suburbia with her family. However they soon realised that pigs need much more space than a tiny backyard. Pearl was moved to a larger property with a new family. Her new family soon grew tired of her after 4 months of digging up the garden and decided to send her to the butcher. The butcher that was planning to kill her crossed paths with a lovely compassionate lady who could not see Pearl sent to slaughter and contacted us. 

    Pearl is currently sharing a home with the chickens at Freedom Hill and loves the company, sharing her food and turning the soil over several times a day for the chickens. It's always teamwork with the residents at Freedom Hill. 

  • Sweetie

    Rescued November 2014

    Sweetie is such a beautiful girl. She arrived at Freedom Hill November 2014, she was advertised on Gumtree as a 'give away'. She was used for breeding for three years and became of no use to the farmer when she developed tumours in her eyes.  Sweetie is totally blind, one of her eyes was injured/poked out and the other had sever tumours which caused blindness. When Sweetie first arrived at Freedom Hill she was terrified, she paced up and down her enclosure and ran at the fences when we tried to get close to her. Slowly over time she has settled into her new home, she knows our voices now and calls out for food when we're close by. Sweetie loves nothing more than fresh hay! She is still a little frightened of new people but is happy and loved. 

  • Teddy

    Born 7th November 2011

    Teddy is a beautiful half Jersey/Friesian steer, he was rescued from a dairy farm at just 4 days old. Teddy was a 'bobby calf' - a waste product of the dairy industry. For dairy cows to produce a continual supply of milk they have to be pregnant or have just given birth, their unwanted calves are usually sent off to slaughter in the first few days of their lives. The milk from the mother cows is used for human consumption. Most 'bobby calves' are not as lucky as Teddy, around 700,000 are slaughtered in Australia every year.

    The day we picked Teddy up we could see he was weak but by day two we had him standing and feeding from a bottle, gaining strength with each feed. Teddy is the sooky boy and loves his cuddles. Teddy's favourite past time is to eat, laze in the sun and to have someone laying with him for a talk & pat.

    Teddy you will always be our big baby.

  • Wakefield

    Born March 2012

    Wakefield's birth date is unknown but came to us on 31st March 2012. Wakefield was found on the side of Port Wakefield Road, a main highway in South Australia. It was clear he had been born on a livestock truck and slipped out of the back, his mother most likely heading for slaughter. Wakefield thrived once fed and warm but we will always wonder the grief felt by his mother, to never see her baby boy. Wakefield now spends his day grazing in the paddocks with his sheep flock and best friend Miss Ebony.

    Wakefield you will always be our lucky one.

Choose how you would like to sponsorship.

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Thank you for choosing to sponsor at Freedom Hill. Sponsorship is a $50 contribution that goes towards feeding and caring for our fury friends.





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Yearly Sponsorship Form


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Address Details






Special Message

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Thank you for choosing to sponsor at Freedom Hill. Sponsorship is a $50 yearly contribution that goes towards feeding and caring for our fury friends. You will receive 14 days notice prior to annual payment and can cancel at any time.





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